List of Adverse Effects of Climate Change as Reported by NASA

Several occurrences are likely to happen because of global warming and its resulting climate change. Some are in fact already happening in different regions, and these were the adverse effects foreseen by climate scientists years ago. Ever since climate change was detected, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been monitoring the changes that transpired in the Earth’s climate.

Checkout the list provided by AllTimeList.com below, as the previous list of adverse effects of climate change has grown longer.

List of Adverse Effects of Climate Change Reported by NASA Scientists

1. Warm Temperatures Will Continue to Rise

In all parts of the world, even in the Arctic, temperatures have already risen in different levels. Mankind has contributed more carbon dioxide than the atmosphere can process; when all that the Earth needs is just the right amount that will allow the atmosphere to disperse enough warmth throughout the planet.

Scientists have explained that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases absorb various kinds of energy, and then re-emits it in the form of heat. As it is, there is now too much carbon dioxide trapped in the atmosphere. Much of the heat re-emitted goes back to Earth; therefore causing the temperatures in different regions to rise.

According to recent climate change reports, the current state is that greenhouse gases have been spiking up global temperatures at an average of 0.8 Celsius. A condition that has been occurring since 1880.

It follows therefore that if mankind continues to send more heat-emitting pollutants in the atmosphere, temperatures will likewise continue to rise and for longer periods.

2. Frost-Free Season or Growing Season will Lengthen

Longer frost-free seasons are at first beneficial because such conditions will give more time for plant growth. More plants mean greater uptake of the carbon dioxide flowing in the atmosphere. CO2 absorption by plants can slow down the increase in rise of temperatures but not necessarily reverse the trend. That is because much of the carbon dioxide that has been previously sent above, had already been trapped as ground-layer ozone that continues to absorb and produce heat.

Over time, longer frost-free seasons or growing season lead to loss of soil moisture, and eventually lead to drought and/or longer fire season.

3. Altered Precipitation Patterns

Water that is present on the Earth’s surface evaporates and rises in the atmosphere in the form of gas that is taken in by the clouds. While in the clouds, condensation takes place; turning back the gases into liquid or rain water. Once the cloud is full, the resulting precipitations fall in the form of snow or temperature, depending on the climate of the region.

Inasmuch as the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere controls the level and duration of heat that will induce precipitation, patterns of precipitation will vary in different regions. Some will experience more precipitation while others will have less; dependent on the level of carbon dioxide and greenhouse gases controlling the heat that goes back to Earth.

4. More Intense and Longer Periods of Drought and Heat Waves

As it is now clear that the level of heat-absorbing carbon dioxide trapped in the atmosphere, can impact the natural water and carbon cycles, the occurrence of droughts and heat waves could occur with greater intensity and for longer periods.

5. Stronger and More Intense Hurricanes

The frequent and stronger hurricanes are already happening and has been noted since early 1980s. If more of the heat trapping gases continue to rise, it will worsen the aforementioned climate changes. As a result, hurricanes will likewise land with greater intensity and come around more frequently.

6. Rise in Sea-Level at 1 to 4 feet by the Year 2100

Our planet has seen its sea level rising by as much as 8 inches since it was first properly monitored in 1880. Unrestrained rise in global heat that has been melting glaciers and ice shelves can cause sea levels to rise by 1 to 4 feet by year 2100.

Scientists predict that if global warming intensifies, the Arctic region will become totally ice-free.