List of Adverse Effects of Climate Change as Reported by NASA

Several occurrences are likely to happen because of global warming and its resulting climate change. Some are in fact already happening in different regions, and these were the adverse effects foreseen by climate scientists years ago. Ever since climate change was detected, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been monitoring the changes that transpired in the Earth’s climate.

Checkout the list provided by AllTimeList.com below, as the previous list of adverse effects of climate change has grown longer.

List of Adverse Effects of Climate Change Reported by NASA Scientists

1. Warm Temperatures Will Continue to Rise

In all parts of the world, even in the Arctic, temperatures have already risen in different levels. Mankind has contributed more carbon dioxide than the atmosphere can process; when all that the Earth needs is just the right amount that will allow the atmosphere to disperse enough warmth throughout the planet.

Scientists have explained that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases absorb various kinds of energy, and then re-emits it in the form of heat. As it is, there is now too much carbon dioxide trapped in the atmosphere. Much of the heat re-emitted goes back to Earth; therefore causing the temperatures in different regions to rise.

According to recent climate change reports, the current state is that greenhouse gases have been spiking up global temperatures at an average of 0.8 Celsius. A condition that has been occurring since 1880.

It follows therefore that if mankind continues to send more heat-emitting pollutants in the atmosphere, temperatures will likewise continue to rise and for longer periods.

2. Frost-Free Season or Growing Season will Lengthen

Longer frost-free seasons are at first beneficial because such conditions will give more time for plant growth. More plants mean greater uptake of the carbon dioxide flowing in the atmosphere. CO2 absorption by plants can slow down the increase in rise of temperatures but not necessarily reverse the trend. That is because much of the carbon dioxide that has been previously sent above, had already been trapped as ground-layer ozone that continues to absorb and produce heat.

Over time, longer frost-free seasons or growing season lead to loss of soil moisture, and eventually lead to drought and/or longer fire season.

3. Altered Precipitation Patterns

Water that is present on the Earth’s surface evaporates and rises in the atmosphere in the form of gas that is taken in by the clouds. While in the clouds, condensation takes place; turning back the gases into liquid or rain water. Once the cloud is full, the resulting precipitations fall in the form of snow or temperature, depending on the climate of the region.

Inasmuch as the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere controls the level and duration of heat that will induce precipitation, patterns of precipitation will vary in different regions. Some will experience more precipitation while others will have less; dependent on the level of carbon dioxide and greenhouse gases controlling the heat that goes back to Earth.

4. More Intense and Longer Periods of Drought and Heat Waves

As it is now clear that the level of heat-absorbing carbon dioxide trapped in the atmosphere, can impact the natural water and carbon cycles, the occurrence of droughts and heat waves could occur with greater intensity and for longer periods.

5. Stronger and More Intense Hurricanes

The frequent and stronger hurricanes are already happening and has been noted since early 1980s. If more of the heat trapping gases continue to rise, it will worsen the aforementioned climate changes. As a result, hurricanes will likewise land with greater intensity and come around more frequently.

6. Rise in Sea-Level at 1 to 4 feet by the Year 2100

Our planet has seen its sea level rising by as much as 8 inches since it was first properly monitored in 1880. Unrestrained rise in global heat that has been melting glaciers and ice shelves can cause sea levels to rise by 1 to 4 feet by year 2100.

Scientists predict that if global warming intensifies, the Arctic region will become totally ice-free.

New Low Cost and Efficient Denim Recycling Process Devised by ACS Chemical Researchers

Researchers at the American Chemical Society (ACS) have come up with a low-cost method that can efficiently convert discarded denims into viscose-like fibers, to be woven as new fabric.

Their newly devised textile recycling process can lessen the large contributions of discarded denim, and other kinds of cotton-based apparels to the wastes that go yearly into landfills. At the same time, it can lessen the demand for cotton, which requires substantial use of land and resources.

Now more than ever, with the growing population and the quickness by which changing fashion turns clothing items into wastes, an efficient and inexpensive method of textile recycling is of utmost importance. Although the current advocacy is for the promotion of circular economy, where wastes can be recycled as new products, the cost it takes to recycle wastes is now an emerging issue.

The ACS Fiber to Fiber Wet Spun Process for Recycling Denim into Cotton

Nolene Byrne and colleagues Beini Zeng, Yibo Ma, and Xungai Wang, ground into powder three types of textile samples: a multi-colored T-shirt, a blue denim fabric and a pair of red denim pants. They then dissolved the powdered cloths in a mixture of ionic liquid, methylimidazolium acetate and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to produce cellulose.

The cellulose will then be spun into fibers that will subsequently be woven into new fabrics. In a previous experiment, they found out that ionic liquid or salt in liquid form, was not as effective. The high viscosity of the solution made the cellulose more difficult to work on. In addition, ionic liquid is more expensive. .

In another experiment, the researchers used DMSO as co-solvent. Reducing the salt solution or ionic liquid, while using DMSO as co-solvent proved more efficient. Since viscosity was reduced, the process of spinning the resulting cellulose into new fibers became easier. In this process, the recycled waste fabric was able to retain its original color.

Furthering their experiment, the ACS researchers pre-treated the powdered textiles with a solution of sodium hydroxide. The resulting cellulose attained a white color, which means this particular process, can also produce white viscose fibers that can be spun into white textile.

Although other methods of recycling denim to produce new textile have been introduced, the processes involved are not as cost efficient.

Application of this newfound textile recycling process therefore, will allow textile manufacturers to use discarded denim and other cotton-based garments as raw materials. Aside from greatly reducing the volume of wastes contributed by discarded clothes, the new method can also reduce the amount of land and resources needed to grow cotton.

Renew Oceans : A Global Mission to Rid the Ocean of Plastic Wastes

Renew Oceans is a global undertaking that aims to tackle the lack of waste infrastructure in countries identified as having high-leakage rivers. A river is regarded as high-leakage if during its overly polluted state, the natural flow of water carries all sorts of debris, particularly plastic wastes, toward the ocean.

In one of the research reports published by the Environmental Science & Technology journal in 2017, data collected by researchers showed that rivers all over the world, sweepingly deposit from about a half, up to three million tons of plastic into the ocean every year.

Of the 57 rivers surveyed by scientists of Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, 10 were identified as high-leakage; posing as major sources of about 93% of the river-borne plastics ending up in the ocean. The ten rivers include Anur, Ganges, Hai, Indus, Mekong, Niger, Nile, Pearl, Yangtze and Yelllow Rivers.

How Will the Renew Oceans Project Address the River-Borne Plastic Wastes?

Using Renewlogy’s ReFence technology, the Renew Oceans project will divert plastic wastes carried by the 10 rivers, in order to prevent entry into oceans. The plastics collected will then create local value for the respective community, as the plastic debris will be converted into other usable materials. At the same time, waste pickers who participated in the localized project, will receive fair compensation based on the value of the plastics they collected.

India’s Ganges River, the First of Renew Oceans ‘ Mission

Renew Oceans’ first project is “Renew Ganga,” an undertaking that aims to divert, collect and convert river plastics deposited by the Ganges River. Data shows that the Ganges, annually contributes as much as 1.2 billion pounds of plastic debris, to the ocean.

“Renew Ganga” will commence this year (2019), whilst receiving support from the Alliance to End Plastic Wastes and the National Geographic.